Archive for the ‘memoir’ Category

The Book of My Father

June 9, 2016

David & Gene Marshall, April 2016

I love and deeply appreciate my 84-year-old dad, but it hasn’t always been easy. I’ve had a strained relationship with my father for most of my life.

As a kid, he felt very distant, leaving it to Mom to care for me, my brother, and my two sisters.  His head buried in a book, he seemed to view it as a chore if I asked him to help me with homework, or play with me.  If I was hurting, he didn’t have much use for my tears, so I stopped crying in front of him at an early age.

As I grew older, he loved to debate with me about religion, politics, and how to make the world a better place, but at the end of each marathon session, my brain lay panting as he was just warming up.  I respected the hell out of my dad’s intellect, powers of persuasion, and commitment to make a difference, but I didn’t feel a lot of warmth coming from him.  He didn’t touch me much or seem to want to be touched by me.  We were about ideas, not feelings.

Dad was a Methodist minister who wanted to “renew the decaying Christian church from within.”  He worried that young people were leaving the church in droves because it was no longer relevant to their lives.  He translated the stories in the bible into language that everybody could understand.  He hoped I would follow in his footsteps, not necessarily as a minister but as a change maker. When I entered the banking world, got admitted to a prestigious business school, and later worked in the software industry, he worried that I was wasting my talents by serving myself instead of others.

I’ve been working as an editor for Berrett-Koehler Publisher (BK) for almost nine years now.  Our mission is to “connect people and ideas to create a world that works for all.” As a writer of many change books himself, my dad understands and respects this job more than my previous choices.  He reads many of our books and spreads the word about them in his newsletter.  Dad brags about my work at BK in ways I never heard during my previous work lives.  My wife Kate and I also write self-prompted family journals to help loved ones communicate.  Ironically, the first one I co-wrote with Dad’s father, Carl Marshall (The Book of Myself: A Do-It-Yourself Autobiography).  They say authors write the books they need the most; maybe that’s why I got into the family communication business myself.  Perhaps I have my dad to partially thank for this.

Even with all these ups and downs, as I sit here today, looking back on my last sixty years, and contemplating my next forty, I’m happy to still have my dad in my life.  He’s shared his wisdom with me, and has shown openness in learning from me.  We’ve come a long way from our cold and overly heady past.  We’re both trying to judge less and listen more.  Dad ends all his emails now with “Love, Dad” and hugs me tight when I visit him.

Dad had a health scare last year that made me realize that he won’t always be in my life. The time we have left together is precious to both of us.  In my last visit, I soaked up his wisdom about religion and spirituality for three days straight, and didn’t tire from it one bit.  He’s thinking about his legacy now and talks about hopes and dreams for the world after he’s gone, and the roles his children and grandchildren might play in realizing those dreams.  And I’m thinking about how to make the most of my second half of life, and see him as an inspiration for keeping mentally and emotionally fit—and staying fully engaged in life.

 

 

Dad, I love you to pieces!

 

 

 

 

 

David@60 – My Mini Life Map

February 15, 2016

I just turned sixty.  After reflecting on my last six decades and envisioning what my seventh decade might look like, I decided to create a mini life map* to tell the story with a few short words and pictures. I titled each decade just like a book chapter with the one or two words that defined the period for me. I then added highlight bullets, emotion words, thinking words, and a summary statement for each decade. Finally, I picked out two or three photos that represented the decade for me. This was a fun and meaningful exercise.  I’m looking forward to what the next ten-year chapter in my life will bring.

DAVID@60

Decade 1 – 1956-1965    FIFTH CITY

  • Germany #1 as preschooler
  • The Order – started in Evanston and then moved to West Side of Chicago
  • Fifth City” Urban Development Project – 16-square-block area near Homan Avenue “L” station
  • The Ecumenical Institute
  • Iron Boy (becoming an Iron Man)
  • Leif Ericson Elementary School
  • Two Fires (Evanston, my parents’ bedroom)
  • The Brotherhood (John, Mark, Wayne, David)

Feeling: Anger, Fear, Crying, Excited, Crazy, Nightmares

Thinking: Hot and cold – I love laying down my life for the mission, I hate it, no, I love it. No, wait….

Statement: The Order and the West Side ghetto of Chicago took me to the edge, but the Brotherhood helped me survive.

IronBoy_ChicagoWestSide  IronManStatueFifthCity  David-Mark_Lief-Ericson_6thgrade_Dec1967

 

Decade 2 – 1966-1975    FREEDOM

  • Third Fire (Chicago riots after MLK killing)
  • Leaving Home at Twelve
  • Iowa in Seventh Grade
  • Malaysia in Ninth Grade
  • Denver in Tenth Grade
  • San Jose, CA in Eleventh and Twelfth Grade
  • The Other World
  • The Institute of Cultural Affairs
  • “Christ Event” in San Jose, CA
  • Left Order
  • San Francisco State University (majored in International Relations & German Literature)
  • Fourth Fire (Wayne’s apartment house arson)
  • Germany #2 – Heidelberg University (junior year abroad)

Feeling: Homesick, Anger, Apathy, Remorse, Lonely, Awe, Exhilaration, Relief, Burning

Thinking: I grew up fast, maybe too fast. I’m lucid but I don’t fit in with non-Order youth.

Statement: In RS-1 language, I had my own Tillich Christ Event at seventeen and awakened to my own profound Bonhoeffer freedom, but it took a near-violent episode to shake me to the core.

David-Malaysia_1971  SFSU-ID

 

Decade 3 – 1976-1985    KATE

  • SFSU Graduation
  • Selling Apple II computers San Francisco financial district with Mark
  • Chase Manhattan Bank in New York City
  • Kindred Spirit Kate on Wall Street
  • Mexico City – Kate & David in penthouse
  • Atlanta – Starting software career at Peachtree Software, Mark & Julian
  • Our wedding in western Massachusetts
  • Boston – Harvard Business School, David L.

Feeling: Loving Soul Mate, Confident, Adventuresome, Taking (more than giving)

Thinking: I’ll make a difference by becoming a minister like my dad and granddad; no, I’ll work for non-profits and the World Bank to change the world; no, I’ll help the world by redistributing the wealth via commercial banking; no, I’ll bring voice to the masses through the microcomputer software revolution. Profoundly appreciative of my short Chase bank tenure since it brought Kate into my life-and changed everything.

Statement: My life changed for the better when I met Kate. I’m the luckiest guy I know.

Kate-David-Wedding-Day-web  Kate-David_Deerfield_10-14-86

 

Decade 4 – 1986-1995    EMILY & BEN

  • Emily born in Boston, Massachusetts
  • HBS graduation, Class of 1987
  • Germany #3 – Munich with Softlab, Klaus
  • Thinking, feeling, dreaming in two languages: German & English
  • Ben born in Munich, Germany
  • Moved to San Francisco with Softlab GmbH/BMW AG
  • JourneyWare Media, Mark & David L.
  • Joined Men’s Group
  • Kate and David’s 10th Anniversary
  • I Want You to Know, Before I Go” (precursor to The Book of Myself)

Feeling: Loving children; not worthy of HBS, but wait, maybe I am; ready to take risks; stressed at running own company with constant fund raising and cash constraint; safe with my men’s group

Thinking: Meeting the Mystery of Life in infant faces of Emily and Ben; entrepreneurial spirit

Statement: Co-creating, helping birth, and raising two children is the most awe-filled experience of my life.

Bo April 1998  Ben-1993  Emily_1993

 

Decade 5 – 1996-2005    MARSHALL BOOKS

  • Settling in Northern California
  • The Book of Myself published (becomes bestseller)
  • The Book of Us published (becomes bestseller)
  • Oracle Corporation, Preet and Mark
  • Homestore, weekly commute to Los Angeles, Preet
  • The Book of My Pet published (first dud)
  • Kabira Software in San Rafael, CA, Mark and Preet
  • Go-go high tech investing and crashing back to earth
  • Emily leaving the nest
  • Kate and David’s 20th anniversary
  • Men’s Group 10th anniversary
  • Leaving software business at 50

Feeling: After many travels, California feels like home; thrilled to be an “author;” relief with Oracle paycheck; exciting Homestore IPO; exhausting battles at Homestore and Kabira; burned out.

Thinking: Book of Myself proves I can work for myself; I’m an investment genius, oh wait, maybe I’m not. It’s time to move on, start over, and reinvent myself.

Statement: As software storms raged, I found my calling and ability to make a difference in Marshall Books.

Carl and David Marshall  BOM 2007 3-D  Book-of-Us_Cover_21.5kb

 

Decade 6 – 2006-2015    WORK REIMAGINED

  • Writing Iron Boy memoir
  • Berrett-Koehler Publishers – second (or third) career, finding true community
  • Ben leaving the nest
  • What I Love About You (becomes bestseller)
  • Emily’s Wesleyan graduation
  • Ben’s UCLA graduation
  • Emily’s University of Minnesota Law School graduation
  • The Book of Myself – second edition published
  • Picture of Me published
  • My Life Map published
  • What I Love About You, Mom published
  • Kate and David’s 30th anniversary
  • Men’s Group 20th anniversary

Feeling: happy, content, invigorated, creative, innovative, compassionate, learning to breathe

Thinking: I’m wearing two hats, one as an author, the other as a publisher, both with a mission to make the world a better place; giving back.

Statement: I’m extending my vocational calling, started with Marshall Books, by working for Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

Macintosh-Development-Team-David-Marshall-2011   BK-staff-photo-for-website_Jan2016

 

Decade 7 – 2016-2025    SPIRITUAL SYNTHESIS

  • Studying Buddhism
  • Studying Christianity
  • I Loved You First – published in 2017
  • Complete and publish Iron Boy
  • Rediscovering music and singing
  • Yoga, Qi Gong, Tai Chi
  • Aging well
  • “Refire Don’t Retire”
  • Kate and David’s 40th anniversary
  • Men’s Group 30th anniversary
  • Discovering the world; embracing global cultures
  • Planting my activist stake: protecting Mother Earth (or something else)
  •  Passing of parents – helping them exit with grace and dignity
  • Making a difference in grandchildrens’ lives

Feeling: peaceful, serene, contemplative, yearning, concerned, giving, body creaking

Thinking: What a gift to be healthy in mind, body, and spirit as I start my seventh decade; it gives me an opportunity to integrate the lessons of my first six decades and to help others with what I’ve gathered.

Statement: Synthesizing my spirit life toward enlightenment; discovering and nurturing my higher self in service of others.

Kate-David-GreatWall   David Avila Beach   Mens-Group2_October-2015

*If you want to do something simple like this for a meaningful milestone in your life, just follow this same formula I used. If you want a more comprehensive version with warm up activities to lead you through the life mapping process for your past, present and future, I recommend My Life Map: A Journal to Help You Shape Your Future, which I co-wrote with my wife Kate.

David Marshall, February 2016

IMG_3068

 

 

My Close Encounter with Steve Jobs and Bill Gates – Thirty Years Ago This Month

July 21, 2014

Everybody remembers that Steve Jobs unveiled the Macintosh in January 1984 and the infamous Superbowl commercial that featured the young woman running down the aisle of a dark theater and throwing her sledgehammer into the screen of Big Brother IBM clones, with the message that the world will never be the same–but few people remember that five months later in July, Steve took his Macintosh, in the form of a two-story Macintosh replica on the exhibit floor, to the National Computer Conference in Las Vegas, and showed off a host of business applications from independent software companies, to prove that his new Mac was no toy.

At the time, I worked for Peachtree Software in Atlanta as the brand manager in the marketing department for our flagship microcomputer accounting software. We had just published “Back to Basics,” the first accounting software for the Mac, and “Back to Basics” was my baby.  Apple invited us to debut it at the NCC show.  They made us feel like part of the Apple family.  They took us out to dinner before the show and gave us all “Macintosh Development Team” shirts with the Apple logo. 

Mac-Development-Team2

Proudly wearing my Apple shirt, I manned my Mac station on the upper floor of the giant two-story Macintosh replica in the exhibit hall.  All the demo pods surrounded a small glass conference room in the middle.  My accounting software demo was interrupted by Steve Jobs and Bill Gates spit shouting at each from purple faces just inches apart just ten feet from me.  This was a big deal for me because I was 28 years old and this was my first big rodeo, and I was a few feet away from two other 28-year olds who were already demi-gods in the microcomputer revolution.  I stopped what I was doing and tried to figure out what they were saying, but couldn’t hear.  I read later that Steve was livid that Bill Gates had stolen his graphic interface for Microsoft’s upcoming first generation of Windows, but that Bill retorted that if anybody had done any stealing, that Steve had stolen it from Xerox PARC, and that Microsoft was just re-purposing it. That was one of the most memorable moments of my high-tech career. It also impressed upon me how much of an evangelist Steve Jobs was for his product and company, and influenced me to only work for companies where I truly believed in the products and services.  I got off course a couple times, but mostly kept on the right path.

Macintosh-Development-Team-David-Marshall-2011

The postscript to this July 1984 close encounter was that when Steve Jobs announced the iPad in January 2010, I called up Apple and told them we wanted to sell our books on the iBookstore.  Berrett-Koehler was one of only seven book publishers that debuted their products on the iPad when it was releases in April of that year.  A year and a half later, when Steve Jobs died, I asked if I could do a tribute to Steve at our monthly staff meeting. The morning of the late October staff meeting, I dug out my Macintosh Development Team shirt and put it on.  After I did my tribute in front of about twenty staff members, Steve Piersanti, our president and founder said, “David, that was a impressive tribute, but the most impressive part is that you still fit into that shirt!

July 1984 to July 2014 – It’s been a wild ride these last 30 years.  Thanks for steering me to my passion, Steve.

 

 

How I Became an Author…

September 8, 2013

My first flirtation with books as a vocation came in 1992 when I founded JourneyWare Media.  I was five years out of Harvard Business School in the pre-Internet era and the children’s educational software market was in full bloom on CD-ROMs, the precursors to DVDs.  I figured that adults would want to learn with visual and audio stimulation as well, so started acquiring the electronic rights to best-selling personal development books.  My childhood buddy Mark joined me with a couple other business school and software friends and we created a Virtual Seminar product line with videos and interactive simulations so people could experience a workshop with an influential author in the comfort of their homes.  In retrospect, this business model was ahead of its time by almost twenty years; it wasn’t until Apple released the iPad in 2010 that the interactive, media-rich, e-book market started to take off.  Nevertheless, one trip to New York City in 1994 to acquire the rights for a best-selling book led me to become an author myself; JourneyWare Media provided an important stepping stone to my life work.

During this same time, my Grandpa Carl (my dad’s dad) started writing his memoirs.  He spoke into a tape recorder and my aunt transcribed them.  He told me that it was an exhilarating experience to tell the stories of his childhood, young adulthood, and later years in a way that could be passed on to future generations of Marshalls.  All the eight grandchildren all loved it.  Grandpa’s 80-something friends were envious, but many of them said that they wouldn’t know where to start in writing their own autobiographies.  Since I was learning the ropes of the book business, I suggested that he and I create a simple fill-in-the blank book that would help people begin telling their stories.  It would ask questions in a logical way that would be easy to answer, provide a skeleton, with users taking an active role in putting the meat on the bones.  If Grandpa’s friends were any indication, lots of people had stories to tell about family, friends, education, work, and the world during the different phases of life.  My brother Wayne, a graphic artist, helped me create a mock-up of the book.

Carl and David Marshall

While I was in New York City in 1994 visiting book publishers trying to get the electronic rights to bestselling personal development books, I also showed around the mock-up of the do-it-yourself memoir book.  Back then, it was called “I Want You to Know… (Before I Go).  Hyperion Book, the adult trade publisher owned by Disney, published the book in 1997 as The Book of Myself: A Do-It-Yourself Autobiography in 201 Questions by Grandpa Carl and me.  Unfortunately, Grandpa Carl died before the book came out, but we are all so happy that he shared his life wisdom in writing before he passed on.  The Book of Myself  has sold almost 400,000 copies so far in two editions.

BOM 2007 3-D

My wife Kate and I then co-authored a second book called The Book of Us: Your Love Story in 150 Questions, which tells the other great story of life, that of the couple.  It was followed by What I Love About You, which is a book of appreciation for partners.  We have written eight books so far (almost 800,000 copies sold), all focused on fostering family communication and self-discovery.  Writing these growth journals gives me purpose and is as a big part of my life work now.

David Marshall

Moraga, California

August 7, 2013

www.marshallbooks.net

Taylor Swift – Her Story Has Just Begun

December 23, 2012

At 22, she’s already America’s sweetheart.  Her records have sold over twenty million copies.  So far, she has won four Grammy awards.  Billboard and American Music Awards named her Artist of the Year.  She writes most of her own melodies and lyrics.  She sings about love and heartbreak.  Former boyfriends, some of America’s most eligible bachelors, including Jake Gyllenhaal and John Mayer, find their way into her songs.  Unlike most young stars, she manages her own business affairs.  She’s on top of the world, so where does she go from here?

Taylor was born in 1989.  Assuming she lives to 100, what will happen between 2013 and 2089?  How will she spend her time, energy, and passion among the big buckets of work, family, friends, education, and service?

Hot on the heels of Reds, her newest album sensation this fall, perhaps Taylor will pause in 2013 to create a life map of her past, present, and future.  If so, here’s what this writer imagines the work part of her map might look like:

Taylor Swift Timeline

Life Title: THE WORLD IS MY STORYBOARD

First 14 Years – Ages 1-14 (1989-2003) – Writing the Early Stanzas

I grew up in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.  Mom named me after James Taylor, hoping a gender-neutral name would help me become a successful businesswoman.  Thanks, Mom, it worked!  Bucking three generations of bankers, I tried my hand at music and theater instead. Then I became interested in country music.  I won a talent contest at eleven singing LeAnn Rimes’s Big Deal.  My love of country music alienated me from the other kids in my middle school.  I convinced my parents to move to Nashville when I was fourteen to pursue my music career.

Next 16 Years – Ages 15-30 (2004-2020) – Re-Imagining Country Music

After winning a national poetry contest, I wrote my first song at twelve.  As an eighth grader, I received an artist development deal with RCA Records based on performances of my own songs. RCA wanted me to wait until I was eighteen to release my first album, but my songs were about my younger life, so I went my own way.  My first big single was Our Song in 2006; it made me the youngest writer and singer of a country song hit.  It was part of my first album, Taylor Swift.  My second album, Fearless, crossed over to pop audiences and became the bestselling album of 2009. My third album, Speak Now, launched me on a thirteen-month tour performing to almost two million fans.

My fourth album, Reds debuted in late 2012 and I’m touring non-stop again. (now for the future I envision)  I live a wholesome life and try to be a role model for my fans.  Until now, I’ve sung about relationships, and how I’ve recovered from ones that didn’t work.  As my fans grow into their twenties like me, I expand my songwriting to include love found, marriage, and raising amazing kids.  My fifth album, Shining Knight, is released in 2015 with songs about falling in love, getting engaged, and becoming newlyweds. Two other albums follow on starting a family.

Next 20 Years – Ages 31-50 (2021-2040) – America’s Singing Life Coach

Since my fans follow my relationship advice, I start writing songs and books about all aspects of life: how to move on from bad bosses, how to make a difference with volunteer work and education, and how to let politicians know when you won’t take it anymore.  My eighth album, Work Day, is released in 2021, my ninth album, We Teach, comes out in 2023, and my tenth album Stand Up, debuts in 2026.  I create a Literacy for All program with local libraries across the country.  Journalists start calling me “America’s Singing Life Coach” and it sticks.  My personal and career advice is based on my Christian upbringing that the highest form of humanity comes through serving others.  I begin investing my winnings in Nashville real estate and media companies. My 2031 personal development book, Greater Than Yourself, becomes a New York Times bestseller.

Next 50 Years – Ages 51-100 (2041-2089) – Business with a Heart

Nashville becomes the epicenter for pop music based on simple melodies and audible lyrics, and I have a little something to do with that.  My entertainment company, Taylored Fit, signs artists who sing pop ballads about all aspects of life.  These bestselling singing life coaches help people across the world create their own best futures. My television network produces family shows that teach people perseverance, resilience, and encourage viewers to reach for the stars.  I model my business after Oprah, but with a focus on helping people through music.

With so much accomplished in her first twenty-two years, it’s almost frightening to think what Taylor Swift might achieve in the next four fifths of her life.  But it helps to have a plan.  From everything we’ve read about Taylor’s life so far, she has been working her master plan with remarkable results. Whether she’s dreaming up what we imagined for her, or something else, you can bet that she’s dreaming big.

David Marshall

Coauthor of My Life Map: A Journal to Help You Shape Your Future, Gotham Books, November 2012

Story Time – Valuing the Past

November 17, 2009

This is a great article from the Wall Street Journal called “Story Time: The Heck with looking foward. There’s value in looking back.”  It is about the wisdom of telling stories from the past to younger family members as “a deft way to transmit lessons about life while strengthening generational bonds.”  It also includes this provocative quote from Austrian psychiatrist and Holocaust survior Viktor Frankl (author of the classic Man’s Search for Meaning) on the value of reflecting on past accomplishments as one grows older: “Why should the old envy the young,” he asked, “for the possibiliteis that a young person has?”  Instead of possibilities, I have realities in my past, not only the reality of work done and of love loved, but of suffering bravely suffered.”  Here’s the full article.

Telling Your Life Story

September 10, 2007

 

Kate, David and Bo (Super Agility Dog) Marshall

 

by Kate Marshall

After years of urging from his family, ninety year old Carl Marshall finally set to work on telling his life story. He spoke into a tape recorder and enlisted his daughter Karldene to transcribe and edit the manuscript. It wasn’t easy, but they were determined. A full year later, Carl proudly distributed his two volume, illustrated memoirs to his children and grandchildren. He passed away two years later.

Just do it. Not everyone has the time, energy and clerical support that Carl had. Many want to record their life stories, but are overwhelmed by the idea. The good news is that there are lots of ways to share your life stories with the next generation. Set perfectionism aside, find the method and tools that suit you and get going. Your family will not judge your writing skills or penmanship; they just want to hear about your life.

Full memoirs. Even if you feel confident about writing a traditional memoir, you may still want to check some “how to” books out of the library to help you structure and focus your memoir. Such books will also offer technical tips on making your writing sing, but a word of caution: don’t let worries about the writing itself stop you. Bang out the first draft so at least that is done, then fiddle with metaphors and grammar if you want to afterwards.

Autobiography tools. If starting with a blank page feels daunting, consider using one of the fill-in autobiography books out there, either to create an attractive finished product or just to trigger and jot down memories before incorporating them into another document later. Just after Carl Marshall labored over his own memoirs, he and his grandson created a best-selling do-it-yourself autobiography journal to make it easier for people: The Book of Myself (Carl and David Marshall, in bookstores for $15.95). It is a keepsake journal divided by early, middle and later years, and by themes such as family, friends, education, work and the world. On the top of each page is a topic that you write about below. For example, one ‘Early Years’ page prompts “What I enjoyed doing most after school was:” Grandmother Remembers ($18.95) and Grandfather Remembers ($19.95), both by Judith Levy, are also popular.

With these aids, you can easily do a little each day, in any order you like. Another advantage to using these books is that your kin will have your stories in your own handwriting, giving it a more personal touch.

If you don’t like to write at all, use The Book of Myself or another tool to prompt you with topics and then talk into an audio tape. Or ask a relative to use the prompts to interview you “live” and video record it.

Get creative. If the linear structure of an autobiography doesn’t feel right, find other ways to give future generations a flavor of who you are. A few ideas:

Family Cook Book. If cooking has been important in your life, collect your favorite recipes into a bound notebook and write about a time you remember making each of the recipes. Where were you? Who else was there? What was discussed or celebrated at the meal? Include recipes handed down to you by other family members. Share some stories about that person or an occasion you remember when they prepared that meal.

Hobby Scrap Book.  Have you had a special hobby or passion for a long time? Collect the yarn or fabric scraps from your knitting or quilting projects. Write about the grandchild you were knitting for, the inspiration for the quilt you made or who taught you to crochet. What friendships developed because of your hobby? Connect your hobby to the people and events in your life and the lessons you learned. Did the first car engine you loved to tinker with power you and your future wife to the prom? Add as many photos, tickets, receipts or other goodies as you can. Visit www.scrapbook.com or Stamp Diego (800-845-2312) for presentation ideas.

Children’s Story. Pick an event in your life that might make a good children’s story: the time your dog ran away, a special Christmas, struggling as the new kid in school one year, your wartime experience or a funny situation when your kids were young. Have fun adding dialog. You won’t remember every detail, so feel free to embellish a little. Keep it short and age appropriate to the reader.  Add photos or illustrate it. Or ask your grandchild to illustrate it for you.

Recording your life stories can be surprisingly easy if you pick the method that suits you, use the tools that are available and don’t insist on perfection. Your family will be very happy to have it, no matter what.

____

Kate Marshall is the co-author of Words to Live By: A Journal of Wisdom for Someone You Love (Emily and Kate Marshall, 2005) and The Book of Us: A Journal of Your Love Story in 150 Questions (David and Kate Marshall, 1998), The Life of My Dog (Marshall Books, 2007).  Her husband David is the co-author of The Book of Myself: A Do-It-Yourself Autobiogrpahy in 201 Questionswww.marshallbooks.com